Summer Reading for Teachers

Lisa Krenz The Lutheran Educator Leave a Comment

Ahhh, summertime and the living is easy . . . right? No, not really. Just because it’s June or July doesn’t mean teachers stop thinking about teaching. Most of the teachers I know spend their summers preparing for the year to come. Sometimes that means taking courses to fulfill requirements for state certifications or advanced degrees, attending week-long workshops in …

Thank you, Lutheran teacher, for changing lives.

Sarah Maney The Lutheran Educator 1 Comment

As summer quickly approaches, you’re probably thinking about the year in review—or perhaps you’re simply looking forward to a relaxing summer. Either way, you’ve just spent a year putting your absolute all into teaching your kids, communicating with families, and preparing them for the future. And, as a Lutheran teacher, you know that just because the year has ended, your prayerful …

summer vacation

The Joy and Challenge of Summer Vacation

Joe Willmann Teaching the Faith at Home 2 Comments

The other night, I sat down with a local Lutheran school principal after work to catch up on some things and discuss some projects that were happening at his school. I had some ideas that might help his projects move a little bit quicker, and then I quickly realized something: summer is right around the corner. “How many weeks do …

Protecting Your Family Online

Joe Willmann Teaching the Faith at Home Leave a Comment

As a parent, God has entrusted you with the care and upbringing of your children. This task has not changed throughout all time. We are called to bring them to the life-giving water of Holy Baptism, to teach them the faith, and to protect them from all harm and evil. No pressure, Mom and Dad. Every age has had things …

Thursday

Working for the Lord

CPH EDU Team Devotions Leave a Comment

Today marks the last day of our devotions on encouraging words found in Colossians, and we’re going to begin with a question: Who do you work for? Your answer may be the name of your school, your principal, or perhaps the LCMS. If you run especially against the grain, you may have even said that you work “for the man.” Yet in Colossians 3, we can learn from Paul that in our vocation as teachers, we’re working for someone far greater than any of these answers acknowledge.

Wednesday

Put on Love

CPH EDU Team Devotions Leave a Comment

When you get ready in the morning, you “put on” many things. You put on clothes, socks, and shoes. When it’s chilly, you put on a hat or a jacket. If you’re a coffee drinker, you may put on a pot of coffee to brew. If you like to stay in the know, you may put the morning news on the television. There are many things to put on in the morning, but one thing is most important to put on—love.

Tuesday

Paying the Bills

CPH EDU Team Devotions Leave a Comment

Of all of the responsibilities that adults have to carry, one of the least liked is paying the bills. Not only does paying the bills require a fair amount of responsibility and organization, but it also means you watch your bank account drop with each payment. At times, the payment due is much larger than you had anticipated, causing your eyes to bulge as you open your bill. Some bills may even come dangerously close to being more debt than we can pay. Can you remember a time when you had a bill that was too much for you to pay? In truth, every person has a debt that was too much to pay off. That debt is our sin.

Teaching Art: Process or Product? Authentic or Crafty? Right or Wrong?

Melissa Smith Teaching in Early Childhood Leave a Comment

Throughout my teaching career, I have seen various ways to approach art with young children. Before receiving my master’s degree in early childhood education, I received a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Concordia University Chicago. Upon graduation, I could not find a full-time job, so I worked part-time teaching junior high Spanish and part-time in a preschool classroom. Needless …

Monday

Strength until Summer

CPH EDU Team Devotions Leave a Comment

Most Lutheran teachers are familiar with the story of God’s people wandering in the wilderness for forty years. Their lack of faith and patience caused them to be stuck wandering for an extra thirty-nine years. During this time, the Israelites were upset, exhausted, and ready to be done.